Comic Reviews

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Uncanny X-Men #1

Ok, Schism's long story short was basically Cyclops and Wolverine having a giant tizzy, culminating in an epic ocean side fistfight because they didn't agree on how each other were running the show so Cyclops packed it in and headed off to Utopia (a protected island for Mutantkind) with a bunch of mutants and Logan was left in charge of the rest, back at the X-Mansion/School.

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The Flash #2


Similar to my previous review of Wonder Woman, I’ve never held a fond place in my heart for 'The Fastest Man Alive' Wally West/ Barry Allen aka The Flash. Sure I’ve seen him do the rounds on Saturday morning Cartoons but the character has never endeared itself to me. The Flash, using the 'Speed Force', has the ability to attain velocity around the speed of light and does whatever he pleases at lightning speeds but is that really enough to base around 60 years worth of comics mythology on?

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Marijuanaman

A true superhero for the New Age! Marijuanaman comes from the brain of Ziggy Marley, the eldest son of the revered reggae legend. Bringing the Cannabis Crusader to life are Joe Casey (Butcher Baker), handling the writing and Jim Mahfood (Clerks), the art, lettering and cover. The tagline for the 48 page, hard cover graphic novel promises 'This is not the comic you think it is' and promises to 'shatter all expectations'.

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Wonder Woman #2

One of the most famous heroines in comics and part of the DC Comics so called 'Trinity' of characters (the other pair obviously being Supes and the Bat), the Amazonian Warrior Princess Diana otherwise known as Wonder Woman, was the recipient of a reboot and series makeover, part of the massive company and title-wide relaunch of the DC Universe called the 'New 52' intiative.

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Ghostbusters #1

Last month, after releasing a series of one shots and mini series, IDW Publishing launched the first issue of an ongoing series of cult, fan-favourite film franchise Ghostbusters. The NYC based, para-psychologists have been appearing in comic book form since the late 1980's around the time Ghostbusters 2 was released. IDW are also big culprits of adapting very popular licensed franchises into comic book series but it's hard to hold it against them when they are mostly giving the fans what they want in varying degress of success and failure.

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A Game of Thrones #1

We've got 5 books approaching 2,000 pages. We've got the audio books totaling some 200 hours. And we've (so far) got a 10 hour, many million dollar budgeted, award winning miniseries on HBO.

Do we really need a comic book, too?

It just doesn’t seem necessary at all but it’s very smart marketing by the clever folks at Dynamite Entertainment because it’s a definite money spinner and if done successfully there is no end in sight for the series for many, many years to come.

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The Mighty

The Mighty was a twelve-part, creator owned comic book series published by DC Comics beginning April of 2009. It was written by longtime fan favourite writer, Peter J. Tomasi with artist turned writer, Keith Champagne and gorgeously illustrated by Peter Snejbjerg. I first heard of it about halfway through this year when it began getting mentioned on various film websites as potentially getting made into a feature film through Paramount Pictures.

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Gladstone's School for World Conquerors #5

Gladstone's School for World Conquerors is one of the best series out and of course it's yet another creator-owned comic published by the unrivalled Image Comics. It is snappily written by Mark Andrew Smith with vibrant and eye popping art by Armand Villavert. It's best described as kind of like Harry Potter except it's no Hogwarts but a school for the youngsters of the menacing supervillians of the world.

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Detective Comics #1

At the start of this month, DC Comics launched an initiative entitled 'The New 52', rebooting almost their entire comics line and starting from scratch with 52 comics series all at number 1. Their grand plan was to reach new audiences by introducing their world famous heroes to people who were never into comics in the first place or too confused by years and years of continuity and mythology and their promise was that anyone could pick up a copy and immediately understand the story.

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M.I.L.F. Magnet

I'm keeping it extra classy this week with a review of one of the finest, most upstanding and highbrow publications you could possibly find on a dusty comic book rack today, M.I.L.F. Magnet. It is a 2009 one-shot (meaning not an ongoing series) written by Tony Lee and illustrated by Daniel Sampere and in my opinion was an attempt at replicating the success of another risqué one-shot published beforehand, The Pro, about a crime fighting prostitute. It was proudly published by a US company called Moonstone Books that specialises mostly in horror, westerns and pulp fiction tales.